28 9 / 2014

susiethemoderator:

quickweaves:

quickweaves:

White people destroyed 3/4s of the world for spices and have the nerve not to season their food.

this post wont die 

I will never stop reblogging.

(via cognitivedissonance)

28 9 / 2014

28 9 / 2014

jessehimself:

never enough

jessehimself:

never enough

(Source: 10on10)

28 9 / 2014

(Source: gifthetv, via jessehimself)

28 9 / 2014

bobbycaputo:

10 Essential African-American Photographers

Thomas Allen Harris’ documentary Through a Lens Darkly: Black Photographers and the Emergence of a People will be playing at New York’s Film Forum through September 9. “The film is a cornucopia of Americana that reveals deeply disturbing truths about the history of race relations while expressing joyous, life-affirming sentiments about the ability of [African-American] artists and amateurs alike to assert their identity through the photographic lens,” Film Forum writes. “What the film strives to say is, when everything around me is telling me I am not worth anything, I can present myself and have a likeness of myself and my talents that shows I have values,” Harris told the New York Times

(Continue Reading)

(via soulbrotherv2)

28 9 / 2014

"But here’s the issue: There’s no regulation that stipulates presidents must salute the troops. In fact, for the first 192 years of our republic, it didn’t happen. None of the first 38 commanders in chief did it. And some of those dudes had some serious military experience.

Eisenhower? Grant? I mean, Teddy Roosevelt was a war hero. Surely he felt compelled to click his heels together and cut a perfect knife-handed salute when he passed a uniform service member, right?

Wrong. It was literally something that Ronald Reagan made up one day."

27 9 / 2014

unfuckyourhabitat:

blueandbluer:

thisoldapt:

DAILY FIND: Sometimes the Internet is a crappy place full of crap. But today I’m reminded that it’s an amazing trove of free and good information from reliable sources: The University of Illinois Extension has created a searchable index of every…

25 9 / 2014

jessehimself:

A Different World

(Source: matildaswormwood)

20 9 / 2014

eternallybeautifullyblack:

Timeless wisdom from some very wise black women from Our Legaci.

33 BRILLIANT QUOTES FROM LEGENDARY BLACK WOMEN WRITERS
Posted by JAM
Growing up as a Black girl writer, various books and writers sustained me. One such writer was Zora Neale Hurston. I lived by her. Her robust unveiling of Black human experiences were the literary nourishment to my young mind. I read over and over again her short story, The Gilded Six Bits.  It was like I was there. I could feel the spirited home of Missie May and Joe. I could taste the molasses kisses Joe bought for their new born baby boy. I was literally wrapped up in the entire story.
Yet what intrigued me the most about Zora as a writer was her free spirit. As a folklorist and anthropologist, she saw the world and soaked up its wonders. This captivated me.  As I grew older, the list of Black women writers that ruled my universe expanded. In college I was enamored with Ntozake Shange, then in graduate school mesmerized by June Jordan. They all knew a part of my soul, they all held pieces of me in their words. It was a long running connectedness. With each page turned, I saw myself.
[Continue reading article and quotes at Our Legaci.]

eternallybeautifullyblack:

Timeless wisdom from some very wise black women from Our Legaci.

33 BRILLIANT QUOTES FROM LEGENDARY BLACK WOMEN WRITERS

Posted by JAM

Growing up as a Black girl writer, various books and writers sustained me. One such writer was Zora Neale Hurston. I lived by her. Her robust unveiling of Black human experiences were the literary nourishment to my young mind. I read over and over again her short story, The Gilded Six Bits.  It was like I was there. I could feel the spirited home of Missie May and Joe. I could taste the molasses kisses Joe bought for their new born baby boy. I was literally wrapped up in the entire story.

Yet what intrigued me the most about Zora as a writer was her free spirit. As a folklorist and anthropologist, she saw the world and soaked up its wonders. This captivated me.  As I grew older, the list of Black women writers that ruled my universe expanded. In college I was enamored with Ntozake Shange, then in graduate school mesmerized by June Jordan. They all knew a part of my soul, they all held pieces of me in their words. It was a long running connectedness. With each page turned, I saw myself.

[Continue reading article and quotes at Our Legaci.]

(via soulbrotherv2)

20 9 / 2014

(Source: blackmen, via soulbrotherv2)